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Scott's middleweight fighter, the Scrapper 105, had a facelift for 2020. We test whether it can still punch above its weight in the backcountry.

Level
Advanced
Flex Rating
0
Terrain
Freeride
Best for
Freeriders with an eye on the backcountry; a great touring/freeride compromise
Price
£525
Season
2019/20
Bindings?
No
Float
10
Versatility
10
Playfulness
9
Energy
10
Value
9
Stability
9
Overall Score
10
+
Tweaks from last year's model have taken this ski from good to excellent!
Nothing

The Scott Scrapper 105 2020/21 remains largely unchanged from last year, so our 2019/20 review of the Scott Scrapper 105, below, still stands.

The Scrapper 105 was a new addition to the Scrapper family for 2018/19 and scored well with our testers among a crowded market. However, minor tweaks to the construction combined with the fact that the freeride segment in general has not been the most progressive section of the market this year, sees the new and improved Scrapper 105 fair quite a bit better among the field.

First, it's seriously good looking this time around! After being panned for its looks last year, Scott have made the most of their building blocks. The same full wood construction has been beefed up underfoot with carbon, which tapers out towards either end. This is what you can see as black geometric patterns which add a lovely texture to the topsheet. Similarly, the fibrous effect throughout is not only cosmetic - it's the materials showing through.

The Scrapper 105 skis very much like the Superguide 95 and loses nothing from the extra width. It could be better at carving short turns, but has the ability to throw itself under your body with great agility, meaning at speed the edge changes feel super responsive, even though they're not carved slalom-type turns.

Long turns are solid and edge hold is great even at speed. They're more stable at speed than similar skis with techy, stripped down tips. They're also nimbler and much lighter than many in the category, so would be great paired with touring bindings as the skin clips suggest.

If backcountry freeride is your particular niche, then there is no better platform in the 'freeride' segment for exploring the whole mountain.